Shepheard-Walwyn

Search Results for: land and taxation

Justice and the Mindset of the Status Quo

Further Reading: Prime Minister by John Stewart Visitors by John Stewart The President by John Stewart He is the author of two biographies and three historical novels: The Centurion, translated into German, Italian and Spanish; The Last Romans, placed in the time of Justinian and Boethius; and Marsilio, centred on the early life of the Florentine philosopher-priest, Marsilio Ficino. In Prime Minister, Visitors and The President, he turns his attention to the present time and explores the contemporary relevance of a reform advocated at the beginning of the 20th century by leading politicians and writers like Bernard Shaw and Leo Tolstoy. John Stewart is the author of three historical novels: The Centurion, The Last Romans and Marsilio, In Prime Minister and two companion novels, Visitors and The President, he turns his attention to the present time and explores the contemporary relevance of a reform advocated at the beginning of the 20th century by leading politicians and writers like Bernard Shaw and Leo Tolstoy. Take the example of a parent and child: it is possible both to punish and to love, when the punishment is directed to the good – teaching a child right from wrong. However, if someone claims to care for a person while exploiting them, the spectre of hypocrisy immediately arises. It is sometimes said, albeit cynically, that the rich help the poor in order to enjoy...

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Global Campaign for Jobs and Poverty Reduction.

Further Reading: Boom Bust by Fred Harrison After a career as an investigative journalist, he was advisor to a number of Russian academic and political bodies, including the Duma (parliament), in their efforts to implement a more equitable transition to a market economy. Recently he has turned his attention to the failure of economic analysis and public policies in the market economies. Progress and Poverty by Henry George Born in Philadelphia in 1839, Henry George went on to San Francisco and became a newspaper editor who addressed the social problems of his day. Progress and Poverty was published in 1879, which is said to be the all-time best selling book on economics. Standing for Justice by John Stewart He is the author of two biographies and three historical novels: The Centurion, The Last Romans, and Marsilio. In Prime Minister, Visitors and The President, he turns his attention to the present time and explores the contemporary relevance of a reform advocated at the beginning of the 20th century by leading politicians and writers like Bernard Shaw and Leo Tolstoy. The People’s Budget by Geoffrey Lee Born in Kent, Geoffrey Lee was one of the authors of a major work on world trade and for many years worked on yearbooks for the Financial Times. ‘Let’s seize this moment to raise a cry for that greater vision — of an economy that lifts...

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Andy Burnham calls for radical tax reform

UPDATE 3/9/10 Following Burnham’s article, further comment on LVT has been published on the Guardian website. Benjamin Fox writes ‘With land value tax, Labour is getting it right’, 2nd September 2010 UPDATE 2/9/10 Comment on Andy Burnham’s article in the Guardian has come from an unexpected source and with surprising support. Read The Spectator’s response here ‘Burnham Goes Blue in the Face’, 27th August 2010 In the final stages of the Labour Party leadership campaign, it is encouraging to hear that one of the candidates, Andy Burnham, has called for ‘a radical tax reform’ with Land-Value Taxation (LVT) at its heart – ‘an idea so old-Labour it can be traced back to Thomas Paine’. This is the first time since the Labour Government of 1929-31 (see also Standing for Justice, Shepheard-Walwyn 2001) that a leading member of the Labour Party has openly acknowledged the many benefits that would flow from this shift of taxation, away from work and enterprise and onto the annual rental value of land, benefits explained in greater detail in the various books in our Ethical Economics list. For the full article...

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Justice and the Mindset of the Status Quo

Author details: John Stewart is the author of three historical novels: The Centurion, The Last Romans and Marsilio. In Prime Minister and two companion novels, Visitors and The President, he turns his attention to the present time and explores the contemporary relevance of Land Value Taxation. He has also written a biography of Andrew MacLaren MP, Standing for Justice Take the example of a parent and child: it is possible both to punish and to love when the punishment is directed to the good – that of teaching the child right and wrong. However, if one claimed to love a person while exploiting them, the spectre of hypocrisy would immediately arise. It is sometimes said, albeit cynically, that the rich help the poor in order to enjoy their privilege with a better conscience – a barren attitude, considering the generous response to disaster appeals, yet one that may conceal some truth. The Christianity of Wilberforce could not live with the barbaric injustice of slavery. For, how could you love your neighbour as yourself if you enslaved him? Yet many lived with such a system. It was simply how it was, so the mindset of the status quo was left unquestioned. Today, it is a common cry that the rich are getting richer while the poor still languish.  Secular, socialistic governments have tried to mitigate with subsidies and benefits, yet little...

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Boom Bust: House Prices, Banking and the Depression of 2010

In the five years since the first edition appeared, events have unfolded as predicted. In 2005 the consensus among forecasters was that the boom in house prices would cool to an annual 2 or 3% rise over the following years. In fact, in keeping with the ‘winner’s curse’ phase of the cycle described by the author, prices have risen by more than 10% per annum in Britain.

ISBN 9780856832543 | Price: £17.95

Buy: Boom Bust

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Standing for Justice: A Biography of Andrew MacLaren MP

Redistributing ever-growing levels of taxation has always been the major weapon for alleviating poverty but what is the cause of poverty? Andrew MacLaren MP, inspired by Henry George, saw clearly the underlying reasons. His views, and the solution to this grave social problem, which were endorsed by no less than five Prime Ministers, make fascinating reading.

ISBN 9780856831942 | Price: £12.95

Buy: Standing for Justice

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Tax reform in the air?

Further Reading: Public Revenue Without Taxation by Ronald Burgess Land and Taxation by Nicolaus Tideman On 4th August The Daily Telegraph carried an article by Andrew Sentance, a senior economic adviser to PwC and a former member of the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee, arguing for a reform because ‘businesses and individuals are struggling to deal with an increasingly anachronistic and disjointed tax system’. The article concludes with a statement that ‘PwC is interested in the views of the public and business on the future of the tax system’. In 1993 Shepheard-Walwyn published Public Revenue without Taxation which was written specifically to explore how a country could transition from the present outdated, unfair and inefficient tax system to one where energy and enterprise were rewarded. Support for a shift in this direction has also come from Tim Worstall, a senior fellow at the Adam Smith Institute in London, in a recent article in the New York...

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How to fund government without killing the geese that lay the golden eggs

Further Reading: Re-Solving the Economic Puzzle by Walter Rybeck Public Revenue Without Taxation by Ronald Burgess Land and Taxation by Nicolaus Tideman Land-Value Taxation by Kenneth C. Wenzer ‘If one were to set out with a specific, stated objective of designing a tax system which would penalise and deter thrift, energy and success, it would be almost impossible to do better than the one which we have in this country today.’ Lord Soames, House of Lords ‘There is a sense in which all taxes are antagonistic to enterprise – yet we need taxes … so the question is, which are the least bad taxes? In my opinion, the least bad tax [note the switch to singular] is the property tax on the unimproved value of land, the Henry George argument of many, many years ago.’ Milton Friedman, American Education League To appreciate Milton Friedman’s point we need to realise that the term ‘property’ covers two distinct elements: the land on which buildings stand and the bricks and mortar with which they are built. Land is the free provision of nature – nobody made it – while buildings are the product of human effort. The classical economists recognised this distinction, calling the former land and the latter capital. Unfortunately, modern economists conflate them and treat them both as capital. The effect is to conceal a natural source of public revenue. To...

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Tony Blair initiative to solve housing crisis

The Observer (3rd Dec) revealed a new initiative to tackle the housing crisis from the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change. Blair is proposing that council tax and business rates, which are currently based on the value of the site and any building or improvement on it, be replaced by a tax which relates solely to the value of the land under the buildings, arguing that it is a “fairer and more rational system of property taxation”.

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To Tax or to Borrow?

This is the dilemma facing the British government – and many others – as they struggle to meet the rising costs of the welfare state while trying to eliminate the budget deficit. The options are either to increase taxation, never a popular move, or to increase borrowing. The cost of the former will fall on present taxpayers, the latter on future generations and the young of today who are being wooed by Jeremy Corbyn.

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The People’s Budget

In his first budget the Chancellor of the Exchequer had the opportunity to set a course for Britain’s prosperity post Brexit and to help Mrs May achieve her goal of making Britain a country that works for everyone, while reducing the budget deficit. Instead the measures he proposed caused a storm of protest.

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